• Publications
  • Influence
The Choice for Europe: Social Purpose and State Power from Messina to Maastricht
Introduction: The choice for Europe 1. Theorizing European Integration 2. Finding the Thread: The Treaties of Rome, 1955-1958 3. Grain and Grandeur: Consolidating the Common Market, 1958-1969 4.
Preferences and Power in the European Community: A Liberal Intergovernmentalist Approach
The European Community (EC) is the most successful example of institutionalized international policy co-ordination in the modem world, yet there is little agreement about the proper explanation for
The Concept of Legalization
We develop an empirically based conception of international legalization to show how law and politics are intertwined across a wide range of institutional forms and to frame the analytic and
Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics
This article reformulates liberal international relations (IR) theory in a nonideological and nonutopian form appropriate to empirical social science. Liberal IR theory elaborates the insight that
Negotiating the Single European Act: National Interests and Conventional Statecraft in the European Community
Sandholtz and Zysman (Chapter 18) argued that supranational actors played a major role in relaunching Europe. Neofunctionalism was suddenly back in style among many students of the European
Reassessing Legitimacy in the European Union
Concern about the EU’s ‘democratic deficit’ is misplaced. Judged against existing advanced industrial democracies, rather than an ideal plebiscitary or parliamentary democracy, the EU is legitimate.
In Defence of the 'Democratic Deficit': Reassessing Legitimacy in the European Union*
Concern about the EU’s ‘democratic deficit’ is misplaced. Judged against existing advanced industrial democracies, rather than an ideal plebiscitary or parliamentary democracy, the EU is legitimate.
The Origins of Human Rights Regimes: Democratic Delegation in Postwar Europe
  • A. Moravcsik
  • Political Science
    International Organization
  • 1 March 2000
Most formal international human rights regimes establish international committees and courts that hold governments accountable to their own citizens for purely internal activities. Why would
A New Statecraft? Supranational Entrepreneurs and International Cooperation
Studies of international regimes, law, and negotiation, as well as regional integration, near universally conclude that political entrepreneurship by high officials of international
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