• Publications
  • Influence
Setting up a discipline: conflicting agendas of the Cambridge History of Science Committee, 1936-1950.
  • A. Mayer
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Studies in history and philosophy of science
  • 1 December 2000
Traditionally the domain of scientists, the history of science became an independent field of inquiry in the twentieth century and mostly after the Second World War. This process of emancipation wasExpand
  • 28
  • 1
'A combative sense of duty': Englishness and the scientists.
  • A. Mayer
  • Philosophy, Medicine
  • Clio medica
  • 2000
  • 8
  • 1
Regenerating England: Science, Medicine and Culture in Inter-War Britain
Notes on contributors. 1. Christopher LAWRENCE and Anna-K. MAYER: Regenerating England: An Introduction. 2. Michael BARTHOLOMEW: H.V. Morton's English Utopia. 3. Christopher LAWRENCE: Edward Jenner'sExpand
  • 13
Moralizing science: the uses of science's past in national education in the 1920s.
  • A. Mayer
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • British journal for the history of science
  • 1 March 1997
The present interest of Englishmen in education is partly due to the fact that they are impressed by German thoroughness. Now let there be no mistake. The war has shown the effectiveness of GermanExpand
  • 16
‘I have been very fortunate…’. Brief report on the BSHS Oral History Project: ‘The history of science in Britain, 1945–65’
The Oral History Project of the British Society for the History of Science (BSHS) ended on 10 July 1998, after almost nine months' duration. Twenty-nine interviews are now available on fifty-eightExpand
  • 8
Setting up a discipline, II: British history of science and “the end of ideology”, 1931–1948
Abstract For the history of science the 1940s were a transformative decade, when salient scholars like Herbert Butterfield or Alexandre Koyre set out to shape postwar culture by promoting newExpand
  • 24
Reluctant Technocrats: Science Promotion in the Neglect-of-Science Debate of 1916–1918
As a named phenomenon, technocracy did not emerge in the Anglophone world until the interwar era and, if recorded language use is anything to go by, it did not blend all that well with EnglishExpand
  • 13
Fatal Mutilations: Educationism and the British Background to the 1931 International Congress for the History of Science and Technology
Evenement marquant de la genealogie de l'histoire des sciences moderne, le Second Congres International de l'Histoire des Sciences et de la Technologie eut lieu a Londres en 1931. L'auteurExpand
  • 9
When things don't talk: knowledge and belief in the inter-war humanism of Charles Singer (1876-1960).
  • A. Mayer
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • British journal for the history of science
  • 1 September 2005
The science historian Charles Singer might seem to have shared with positivists a widely held commitment to observation as the foundation of knowledge. Yet in fact Singer's historiography wasExpand
  • 9
The Mammoth’s Part in the World’s Demise. Of the End of Humanity in Early Science Fiction
La disparition de l’humanite est un theme litteraire qui remonte aussi loin que l’ecriture. A l’epoque romantique, la structure narratologique de la litterature apocalyptique en Occident aExpand
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