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Interpersonal Recognition: A Response to Value or a Precondition of Personhood?
This article suggests first that the concept of interpersonal recognition be understood in a multidimensional (as opposed to one-dimensional), practical (as opposed to symbolic), and strict (asExpand
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Solidarity: Theory and Practice
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Analyzing recognition: identification, acknowledgement and recognitive attitudes towards persons
There is a wide consensus today that ‘recognition’ is something that we need a clear grasp of in order to understand the dynamics of political struggles and, perhaps, the constitution and dynamics ofExpand
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Strong Evaluation Without Moral Sources: On Charles Taylor's Philosophical Anthropology and Ethics
Charles Taylor is one of the leading living philosophers. In this book Arto Laitinen studies and develops further Taylor's philosophical views on human agency, personhood, selfhood and identity. HeExpand
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Recognition and Social Ontology
1. Heikki Ikaheimo & Arto Laitinen Recognition and Social Ontology Recognition and the Social Ontology of Personhood 2. Robert B. Brandom The Structure of Desire and Recognition: Self-ConsciousnessExpand
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Dimensions of Personhood
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Solidarity: Theory and Practice. An Introduction
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Esteem for Contributions to the Common Good: The Role of Personifying Attitudes and Instrumental Value
Social esteem based on contributions to the common good, or to the good of others, is an important phenomenon, and, following Axel Honneth, it can be seen as an important subspecies of interpersonalExpand
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Characterization of Flame Cut Heavy Steel: Modeling of Temperature History and Residual Stress Formation
Heavy steel plates are used in demanding applications that require both high strength and hardness. An important step in the production of such components is cutting the plates with a cost-effectiveExpand
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Recognition, Needs and Wrongness
`Due recognition is a vital human need', argues Charles Taylor. In this article I explore this oft-quoted claim from two complementary and equally appealing perspectives. The bottom—up approach isExpand
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