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Case-control study of antenatal and intrapartum risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm singleton babies
TLDR
The frequency of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies decreased with increasing gestational age and birthweight and the effect of rigorous management of adverse antenatal factors on the frequency should be tested in randomised controlled trials. Expand
Impact of feeding problems on nutritional intake and growth: Oxford Feeding Study II.
TLDR
Assessment of feeding difficulties in children with disabilities confirmed the significant impact of neurological impairment in children on body growth and nutritional status becoming worse in those with a greater degree of motor impairment. Expand
Case gender and severity in cerebral palsy varies with intrauterine growth
TLDR
The greater the degree to which growth deviates up or down from optimal weight-for-gestation at birth, the higher is the rate of cerebral palsy, the larger is the proportion of male cases, and the more severe is the functional disability. Expand
Educational and behavioural problems in babies of 32–35 weeks gestation
TLDR
Up to a third of children born between 32 and 35 weeks gestation may have school problems, and this finding has implications for educational services. Expand
Cerebral palsy and neonatal encephalopathy.
TLDR
Children with cerebral palsy who were born at term and have neonatal encephalopathy are more likely to have had signs of intrapartum asphyxia and are morelikely to have a more severe form of cerebral palsies than those without a history of neonatalEncephalopathy. Expand
Prevalence and severity of feeding and nutritional problems in children with neurological impairment: Oxford Feeding Study
TLDR
The results highlight that feeding problems in children with neurological impairment are common and severe, causing parental concern, and many of these children would benefit from nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care. Expand
Change of refractive state and eye size in children of birth weight less than 1701 g
TLDR
Low birth weight and ROP both significantly impact the refractive state in the long term, and at age 10–12 years children born preterm have an increased prevalence of all refractive errors. Expand
Clinical associations of prenatal ischaemic white matter injury.
TLDR
The findings suggest that chronic intrauterine hypoxia may be associated with damage to cerebral white matter among fetuses and infants who die and the relation between ischaemic white matter damage and cerebral palsy among survivors remains speculative. Expand
Acid-base status at birth and neurodevelopmental outcome at four and one-half years.
TLDR
The ability of the fetus to produce an acidosis in response to the stress of labor may be beneficial to long-term outcome, and coincident acidosis was not associated with a worse outcome for infants with low Apgar scores. Expand
Visual function in low birthweight children
TLDR
Low birthweight children have a small but statistically significant deficit in both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, which is similar to that of children born at full term. Expand
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