• Publications
  • Influence
The reaction between acetyl choline and muscle cells
  • A. J. Clark
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 6 August 1926
  • 181
  • 6
The Rate of Action of Drugs on Cells
The rate of response of a tissue to the action of a drug can be studied in two way: (1) Measurement of some graded action. The following are simple examples of this type of response: theExpand
  • 293
  • 4
The antagonism of acetyl choline by atropine
  • A. J. Clark
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 6 August 1926
  • 113
  • 4
The effect of alterations of temperature upon the functions of the isolated heart
  • A. J. Clark
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 7 December 1920
  • 46
  • 1
The action of ions and lipoids upon the frog's heart
  • A. J. Clark
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 17 October 1913
  • 120
  • 1
The reaction between acetyl choline and muscle cells
  • A. J. Clark
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of physiology
  • 21 November 1927
IN a previous paper(l) the writer described the relation between the concentration and the action of acetyl choline on the isolated heart and on the rectus abdominis of the frog. Loewi andExpand
  • 40
The action of ions upon the frog's heart
THE following experiments were undertaken to analyse the effect upon the mechanical and electrical responses of the frog's heart of changes in the concentration of the kations, which are normallyExpand
  • 102
THE ANTAGONISM OF ACETYLCHOLINE AND OF QUATERNARY AMMONIUM SALTS
1. The study of a number of antagonists in a variety of tissues shows that all drugs which antagonise acetylcholine also antagonise Me4N. 2. The concentration of antagonist needed in anyExpand
  • 46
The anaerobic activity of the isolated frog's heart
A STUDY of the literature regarding the effect of oxygen lack on the heart showed that different workers had obtained very contradictory results. Some authors stated that oxygen lack produced anExpand
  • 32
Asphyxial arrest of the isolated frog's ventricle
THE only known sources of energy available to the isolated frog's ventricle, when this is deprived of oxygen, are the breakdown of phosphagen and the conversion of carbohydrate to lactic acid. TheExpand
  • 5