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Horse vision and an explanation for the visual behaviour originally explained by the 'ramp retina'.
TLDR
It is confirmed that the 'ramp retina' of the horse, once thought to result in head rotating visual behaviour, does not exist and it is improbable that the horse rotates its head to focus onto the peripheral retina. Expand
Neuronal density in the human retinal ganglion cell layer from 16–77 years
TLDR
It is shown that, while RPE cell number does not change, cell density increases significantly in central temporal retina (macular region) as the retina ages and speculated that the increase in density represents a “drawing together” of the retinal sheet to maintain high cell densities in this region of the neural retina, in the face of presumed cell loss from the ganglion cell layer due to aging. Expand
A Strong Correlation Exists between the Distribution of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Nose Length in the Dog
TLDR
The genetic manipulation of selective breeding has produced an abnormal shortening of the skull and eyelids with less lateral apertures and has also produced a considerably more pronounced area centralis in the dog, which is quite unique. Expand
Retinal Structure and Visual Acuity in a Polyprotodont Marsupial, the Fat-Tailed Dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata)
TLDR
The visual system of the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata), a small polyprotodont marsupial, has been examined both anatomically and behaviourally and visual acuity, estimated from counts of peak ganglion cell density and measurements of posterior nodal distance, was found to be 2.30 cycles per degree. Expand
Generation of retinal cells in the wallaby, Setonix brachyurus (quokka)
TLDR
It is suggested that later differential cell addition to the inner and outer nuclear layers contributes to an asymmetric increase in retinal area and may play a role in establishing density gradients of ganglion cells. Expand
Anatomical comparison of the macaque and marsupial visual cortex: Common features that may reflect retention of essential cortical elements
TLDR
Despite large differences in overall area and thickness of V1 cortex between these animals, the absolute size of pyramidal neurons is remarkably similar, as are their specific dendritic branch patterns and patterns of distribution of intrinsic axons, arguing for a highly conserved framework of cellular detail in macaque primary visual cortex rather than convergent evolution of these features. Expand
Variability in the Location of the Retinal Ganglion Cell Area Centralis Is Correlated with Ontogenetic Changes in Feeding Behavior in the Black Bream, Acanthopagrus butcheri (Sparidae, Teleostei)
TLDR
The development of neural cell topography in the retinal ganglion cell layer was examined in a teleost, the black bream, and a correlation between the preferred mode of feeding and the position of the AC was found, such that those individuals feeding in mid-water or at the surface possess a temporal or intermediate (dorso- temporal) AC, whereas those predominantly feeding from the bottom possess a dorsal AC. Expand
The Retinal Ganglion Cell Layer and Visual Acuity of the Camel
TLDR
On the basis of ganglion cell density, it is estimated that the peak acuity in the dromedary camel is about 10 and 9.5 cycles per degree in the temporal and nasal high density regions respectively and falls to 2–3 cycles perdegree in the central retina. Expand
Development of the visual cortex in a wallaby--phylogenetic implications.
TLDR
The visual cortex of one of the smallest macropod marsupials, a wallaby, was examined at maturity and during development from postnatal day 1 to 150 in Nissl-stained or Golgi-stained sections, and it was confirmed that geniculate axons in the wallabies have a relatively longer 'wait' for their target neurons than do those in cats or monkeys. Expand
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