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Worldwide Patterns of Ancestry, Divergence, and Admixture in Domesticated Cattle
TLDR
It is argued that cattle migration, movement and trading followed by admixture have been important forces in shaping modern bovine genomic variation.
Origins and Genetic Legacy of Neolithic Farmers and Hunter-Gatherers in Europe
TLDR
The results suggest that migration from southern Europe catalyzed the spread of agriculture and that admixture in the wake of this expansion eventually shaped the genomic landscape of modern-day Europe.
Molecular analysis of Neanderthal DNA from the northern Caucasus
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis places the two Neanderthals from the Caucasus and western Germany together in a clade that is distinct from modern humans, suggesting that their mtDNA types have not contributed to the modern human mtDNA pool.
Genomic Diversity and Admixture Differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian Foragers and Farmers
Hunters and Farmers The Neolithic period in Europe saw the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to farming. Previous genetic analyses have suggested that hunter-gatherers were replaced by
Cattle domestication in the Near East was followed by hybridization with aurochs bulls in Europe
TLDR
The data suggest that the origin of domestic cattle may be far more complex than previously thought, and is more similar to haplotypes from ancient specimens of European aurochsen than to contemporary cattle breeds from southern Europe and the Near East.
Staying out in the cold: glacial refugia and mitochondrial DNA phylogeography in ancient European brown bears
TLDR
This work proposes continuous gene flow across southern Europe, from which brown bear populations expanded after the last glaciation, and shows a complex phylogeographical history for western European populations.
The genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic
TLDR
The long-term genetic continuity of the Paleo-Eskimos gene pool and lack of evidence of Native American admixture suggest that the Saqqaq and Dorset people were largely living in genetic isolation after entering the New World.
High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe
TLDR
The frequency of an allele (-13910*T) associated with lactase persistence in a Neolithic Scandinavian population is investigated and it is found that the T allele frequency was very low (5%) in this Middle Neolithic hunter-gatherer population, and that the frequency is dramatically different from the extant Swedish population.
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