• Publications
  • Influence
Plant Species Richness and Ecosystem Multifunctionality in Global Drylands
TLDR
A global empirical study relating plant species richness and abiotic factors to multifunctionality in drylands, which collectively cover 41% of Earth’s land surface and support over 38% of the human population, suggests that the preservation of plant biodiversity is crucial to buffer negative effects of climate change and desertification in dryland.
Extreme climatic events and vegetation: the role of stabilizing processes
TLDR
A demographic framework is proposed to understand this inertia to change based on the balance between adult mortality induced by the event and enhanced recruitment or adult survival after the event, crucial for the establishment of sound management strategies and actions addressed to improve ecosystem resilience under climate change scenarios.
Shrub encroachment can reverse desertification in semi-arid Mediterranean grasslands.
TLDR
Evaluating the effects of shrub encroachment on the structure and composition of multiple biotic community components, and on various indicators of ecosystem function in degraded Mediterranean grasslands suggests that shrub establishment may be an important step in the reversal of desertification processes in the Mediterranean region.
Decoupling of soil nutrient cycles as a function of aridity in global drylands
TLDR
Any predicted increase in aridity with climate change will probably reduce the concentrations of N and C in global drylands, but increase that of P, suggesting the provision of key services provided by these ecosystems could be negatively affected.
Probability of germination after heat treatment of native Spanish pines
TLDR
La probabilite de germination apres chauffage a ete modelisee au moyen de regressions multiples logistiques utilisant the temperature, the duree d'exposition et leur interaction comme variables predictives, excepte pour Pinus pinea.
Plants living on gypsum: beyond the specialist model.
TLDR
Differences suggest that the three groups of gypsum plants follow diverse ecological strategies, including regionally dominant gypsophiles, gypsovags and narrow-gypsophile endemics, which might fit the 'refuge' model, being stress-tolerant species that find refuge on Gypsum soils from competition.
...
...