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Acclimation to different thermal conditions in a northerly wintering shorebird is driven by body mass-related changes in organ size
TLDR
Cold acclimation in a migrant shorebird known for extreme physiological flexibility, the red knot, is investigated and results indicate that relatively small changes in body mass and muscle size allow enough reserve capacity in terms of heat production to cope with typical wintering ambient temperature variations as measured on the red Knot's wintering grounds.
Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling.
TLDR
Pectoral muscle mass changes may reflect the breakdown of protein during heavy exercise and its subsequent restoration, the regulation of flight capacity to maintain optimal flight performance when body mass varies, or the need for a particular protein:fat ratio in winter survival stores.
Long‐term indirect effects of mechanical cockle‐dredging on intertidal bivalve stocks in the Wadden Sea
TLDR
Sediment characteristics, together with the total stock size and settlement densities of Cerastoderma, Baltic tellin Macoma balthica and soft-shelled clam Mya arenaria, were documented during 11 successive autumns before and after the suction-dredging event in fished and unfished areas.
Patchiness of macrobenthic invertebrates in homogenized intertidal habitats: hidden spatial structure at a landscape scale
TLDR
It is argued that future research should focus on spatial structure in species' distrib- utions as an ecological relevant parameter.
Digestive bottleneck affects foraging decisions in red knots Calidris canutus. II. Patch choice and length of working day
TLDR
This work a priori modelled patch use, prey choice, and daily foraging times as a function of gizzard size in free-ranging, radio-marked, red knots and discusses that red knots might be aiming for a slightly positive energy budget in order to refuel their stores depleted during migration, and to insure against unpredictability in supply and demand during winter.
Empirical evidence for differential organ reductions during trans–oceanic bird flight
TLDR
Body condition in a medium–sized shorebird, the great knot, before and after a flight of 5400 km from Australia to China during northward migration is studied, suggesting that apart from brains and lungs no organs are homeostatic during long–distance flight.
Is Long‐Distance Bird Flight Equivalent to a High‐Energy Fast? Body Composition Changes in Freely Migrating and Captive Fasting Great Knots
TLDR
Organ changes during migratory flight are similar to those of a low‐energy fast, although the length of the fast in this study probably accentuated organ reductions in some functional groups.
Interactions Between Stomach Structure and Diet Choice in Shorebirds
TLDR
It is likely that, in the course of their annual cycle, shorebirds are prevented from achieving maximal digestive performance owing to seasonal changes in feeding habitats and diet enforced by their long-distance migrations.
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