• Publications
  • Influence
Dreams, emotions, and social sharing of dreams
Current life emotional experiences have been demonstrated to elicit a process called social sharing of emotion, consisting of repetitive talking about these experiences in conversations with relevant
Flashbulb memories in social groups: A comparative test–retest study of the memory of French President Mitterrand's death in a French and a Belgian group
TLDR
The results indicated that the flashbulb memory for Mitterrand's death is affected by group provenance, as French people showed higher levels of recall for the flash Bulb memory attributes and their determinants than Belgian people.
Follow-up of a cross-national comparison on flashbulb and event memory for the September 11th attacks
TLDR
Results showed that national membership had a significant impact on event memory, and the emotional and rehearsal variables, but flashbulb memories for the September 11th attacks were found to be high and consistent across different countries.
Negative emotional experiences arouse rumination and affect working memory capacity.
TLDR
It is argued that ruminative processes deplete working memory resources, making them less available for concurrent tasks; in addition, rumination tends to persist over time.
Risk Perceptions and Psychological Effects During the Italian COVID-19 Emergency
The current study provides data about the immediate risk perceptions and psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic among Italian participants. A sample of 980 volunteers answered a web-based
The temporal evolution of social sharing of emotions and its consequences on emotional recovery: a longitudinal study.
TLDR
It is confirmed that social sharing is a common consequence of experiencing an emotion, regardless of participants' levels of education, which tends to diminish over time, leading to an increasing sense of recovery.
The Cognitive, Emotional, and Social Impacts of the September 11 Attacks: Group Differences in Memory for the Reception Context and the Determinants of Flashbulb Memory
TLDR
Group differences in memories for hearing the news of and reactions to the September 11 attacks in 2001 showed large differences in self-rated importance of the news and in memory for event-related facts and within non-U.S. groups, there were large differences for emotional-feeling states and moderate differences for personal rehearsal, background knowledge, and attitudes toward the United States.
The 9/11 attacks inside and outside the US: Testing four models of flashbulb memory formation across groups and the specific effects of social identity
TLDR
Structural equation modelling revealed that a revision of Finkenauer et al.'s (1998) model provided the best fit indices in both the US and non-US groups, and the specific activation of social identity in the US group can explain these differences.
Flashbulb memories of the Pope's resignation: Explicit and implicit measures across differing religious groups
TLDR
The present evidence supports the idea that FBMs are special autobiographical memories which remain detailed, certain and consistent over time.
...
...