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A Prospective Study of Red and Processed Meat Intake in Relation to Cancer Risk
TLDR
Both red and processed meat intakes were positively associated with cancers of the colorectum and lung; furthermore, red meat intake was associated with an elevated risk for cancer of the esophagus and liver.
A large prospective study of meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an investigation of potential mechanisms underlying this association.
TLDR
A positive association for red and processed meat intake and colorectal cancer is found; heme iron, nitrate/nitrite, and heterocyclic amines from meat may explain these associations.
Trends in meat consumption in the USA
TLDR
Understanding the trends and determinants of meat consumption in the USA, where meat is consumed at more than three times the global average, should be particularly pertinent to researchers and other public health professionals aiming to reduce the global burden of chronic disease.
Meat intake and mortality: a prospective study of over half a million people.
TLDR
Red and processed meat intakes were associated with modest increases in total mortality, cancer mortality, and cardiovascular disease mortality.
Meat‐related mutagens/carcinogens in the etiology of colorectal cancer
TLDR
The types of studies that may be required in the future to clarify the association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer are evaluated, and the current epidemiologic knowledge of meat‐related mutagens is reviewed.
Effect of white versus red meat on endogenous N-nitrosation in the human colon and further evidence of a dose response.
TLDR
It is shown that the equivalent amount of meat as white meat has no effect on fecal ATNCs in 12 volunteers, and the effects of nonmeat protein and of heme on increased N-nitrosation and the genotoxic effects of the AT NCs produced are presently being investigated.
Haem, not protein or inorganic iron, is responsible for endogenous intestinal N-nitrosation arising from red meat.
TLDR
Endogenous N-nitrosation, arising from ingestion of haem but not inorganic iron or protein, may account for the increased risk associated with red meat consumption in colorectal cancer.
Meat Consumption and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer in a Large Prospective Study
TLDR
Positive associations between red meat intake and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and between DiMeIQx intake and gastric cardia cancer are found.
Meat and meat-related compounds and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective cohort study in the United States.
TLDR
Red and processed meat may be positively associated with prostate cancer via mechanisms involving heme iron, nitrite/nitrate, grilling/barbecuing, and benzo[a]pyrene.
Intake of meat, meat mutagens, and iron and the risk of breast cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial
TLDR
Red meat, MeIQx, and dietary iron elevated the risk of invasive breast cancer, but there was no linear trend in the association except for dietary iron.
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