• Publications
  • Influence
The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965
We normally think of viruses in terms of the devastating diseases they cause, from smallpox to AIDS. But in "The Life of a Virus, " Angela N. H. Creager introduces us to a plant virus that has taughtExpand
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Science without laws : model systems, cases, exemplary narratives
Physicists regularly invoke universal laws, such as those of motion and electromagnetism, to explain events. Biological and medical scientists have no such laws. How then do they acquire a reliableExpand
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Adaptation or selection? Old issues and new stakes in the postwar debates over bacterial drug resistance.
  • A. Creager
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Studies in history and philosophy of biological…
  • 1 March 2007
The 1940s and 1950s were marked by intense debates over the origin of drug resistance in microbes. Bacteriologists had traditionally invoked the notions of 'training' and 'adaptation' to account forExpand
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Tobacco Mosaic Virus: Pioneering Research for a Century
One century ago, M.W. Beijerinck contended that the filterable agent of tobacco mosaic disease was neither a bacterium nor any corpuscular body, but rather that it was a contagium vivum fluidumExpand
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Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine
After World War II, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) began mass-producing radioisotopes, sending out nearly 64,000 shipments of radioactive materials to scientists and physicians by 1955. EvenExpand
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Radiobiology in the Atomic Age: Changing Research Practices and Policies in Comparative Perspective
This essay introduces a special collection of papers by Angela Creager, Soraya de Chadarevian, Karen Rader, Jean-Paul Gaudillière, and María Jesús Santesmases on the theme “Radiobiology in the AtomicExpand
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Tracing the politics of changing postwar research practices: the export of ‘American’ radioisotopes to European biologists
Abstract This paper examines the US Atomic Energy Commission’s radioisotope distribution program, established in 1946, which employed the uranium piles built for the wartime bomb project to produceExpand
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Meanings in Search of Experiments and Vice-Versa: The Invention of Allosteric Regulation in Paris and Berkeley, 1959-1968
La regulation allosterique cellulaire controlee par les enzymes decouverte par Monod (J.) en 1961, l'action des genes sur la synthese et la structure des proteines avancee par Monod (J.) et JacobExpand
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Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950
  • A. Creager
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of the history of biology
  • 11 October 2006
The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the “physicists’ war” for postwar life science. Scientists in theExpand
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Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 1946-1953.
The development of nuclear "piles," soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemicalExpand
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