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Evolutionary neutrality of mtDNA introgression: evidence from complete mitogenome analysis in roe deer
TLDR
It is suggested that the highly divergent C. capreolus lineage could have maintained a capability for genomic incorporation of the well‐preserved and almost ancestral type of mtDNA present in C. pygargus, suggesting that the present widespread introgression is evolutionarily neutral.
Unexpected population genetic structure of European roe deer in Poland: an invasion of the mtDNA genome from Siberian roe deer
TLDR
The population genetic structure of the European roe deer in Poland is inferred from mitochondrial (CR and cyt b) and sex‐linked markers (ZFX, SRY, DBY4 and DBY8) and it is suggested that C. pygargus could have extended its range as far west as Central Europe after last glacial maximum.
Seasonal changes in gut morphology of the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius)
TLDR
Because gut size decreased toward late autumn, it is suggested that late autumn was not a stressful period (i.e., because of low temperature or poor-quality food) for wild field mice.
Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the field vole, Microtus agrestis, and their cross-utility in the common vole, Microtus arvalis
TLDR
Nine polymorphic microsatellite loci for the field vole, Microtus agrestis, were developed and successfully analysed and will be employed in studies of reproductive success and fine-scale spatial genetic structure.
Moose browsing on pine and willow in the Biebrza Valley, Poland
TLDR
In the willow-birch shrubs the use of browse was high and amounted to 85% of total production in both the winter periods studied and moose browsed not only the last year's growth of shoots but also that of earlier years.
Sex-biased polyparasitism in moose (Alces alces) based on molecular analysis of faecal samples
Promiscuity, male reproductive success and mate relatedness in a natural population of the common vole
TLDR
The results suggest that the occurrence of multiple paternity in the common vole population can be explained by the inability of males to monopolize and mate with all females of a colony, and also by their tendency to increase their reproductive success by getting access to already mated females.
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