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A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane
A large fraction of globally produced methane is converted to CO2 by anaerobic oxidation in marine sediments. Strong geochemical evidence for net methane consumption in anoxic sediments is based on
Anaerobic oxidation of methane: progress with an unknown process.
TLDR
This review summarizes what is known and unknown about AOM on earth and its key catalysts, the anaerobic methanotrophic archaea clades and their bacterial partners.
Diversity and Distribution of Methanotrophic Archaea at Cold Seeps
TLDR
Variations in the distribution, diversity, and morphology of methanotrophic consortia are discussed with respect to the presence of microbial ecotypes, niche formation, and biogeography.
Microbial Reefs in the Black Sea Fueled by Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane
TLDR
Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for the understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history.
Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink
TLDR
It is found that the upward flow of sulphate- and oxygen-free mud volcano fluids restricts the availability of these electron acceptors for methane oxidation, and hence the habitat range of methanotrophs, which limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux.
Diversity and Abundance of Aerobic and Anaerobic Methane Oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea
TLDR
The results further support the hypothesis that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs.
Activity, Distribution, and Diversity of Sulfate Reducers and Other Bacteria in Sediments above Gas Hydrate (Cascadia Margin, Oregon)
Cold seep environments such as sediments above outcropping hydrate at Hydrate Ridge (Cascadia margin off Oregon) are characterized by methane venting, high sulfide fluxes caused by the anaerobic
In vitro cell growth of marine archaeal-bacterial consortia during anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate.
TLDR
Concentrations of biomarker lipids previously attributed to ANME-2 archaea and Desulfosarcina-like bacteria strongly increased over time, suggesting that they are useful biomarkers to detect active anaerobic methanotrophic consortia in sediments.
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