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Four easy pieces for assessing the usability of multimodal interaction: the CARE properties
TLDR
We propose the CARE properties as a simple way of characterising and assessing aspects of multimodal interaction: the Complementarity, Assignment, Redundancy, and Equivalence that may occur between the interaction techniques available in a multimodAL user interface. Expand
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Conceptualising engagement with digital behaviour change interventions: a systematic review using principles from critical interpretive synthesis
Abstract“Engagement” with digital behaviour change interventions (DBCIs) is considered important for their effectiveness. Evaluating engagement is therefore a priority; however, a sharedExpand
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Understanding and Promoting Effective Engagement With Digital Behavior Change Interventions.
This paper is one in a series developed through a process of expert consensus to provide an overview of questions of current importance in research into engagement with digital behavior changeExpand
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Group and Individual Time Management Tools: What You Get is Not What You Need
TLDR
This interview study reports how users exploit paper, personal digital assistants (PDAs) and group scheduling system for their time management. Expand
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Designing for dabblers and deterring drop-outs in citizen science
TLDR
In most online citizen science projects, a large proportion of participants contribute in small quantities. Expand
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DiCoT: A Methodology for Applying Distributed Cognition to the Design of Teamworking Systems
TLDR
We present DiCoT (Distributed Cognition for Teamwork) is a methodology and representational system we are developing to support distributed cognition analysis of small team working. Expand
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Scoping Analytical Usability Evaluation Methods: A Case Study
TLDR
A systematic comparison of eight analytical UEMs on a multimodal robotic arm interface. Expand
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Coming across information serendipitously - Part 1: A process model
TLDR
An empirical study of researchers’ experiences of ‘coming across information serendipitously’ as part of their research. Expand
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“Making my own luck”: Serendipity strategies and how to support them in digital information environments
TLDR
Designing digital information environments to support serendipity can not only provide users with new knowledge, but also propel them in directions they might not otherwise have traveled in—surprising and delighting them along the way. Expand
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A library or just another information resource? A case study of users' mental models of traditional and digital libraries
TLDR
A user's understanding of the libraries they work in, and hence of what they can do in those libraries, is encapsulated in their mental models" of those libraries. Expand
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