• Publications
  • Influence
On the dual effects of repetition on false recognition.
  • A. Benjamin
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning…
  • 1 July 2001
TLDR
The results suggest dual bases for the recognition decision, one of which is based on the rapid spread of activation within domains of semantic similarity and the other of which functions to attribute that activation to likely sources and set appropriate decision criteria.
The mismeasure of memory: when retrieval fluency is misleading as a metamnemonic index.
TLDR
In each of 3 experiments, participants' predictions of their own future recall performance were examined under conditions in which probability or speed of retrieval at one time or on one task is known to be negatively related to retrieval probability on a later task.
Signal detection with criterion noise: applications to recognition memory.
TLDR
ND-TSD poses novel, theoretically meaningful constraints on theories of recognition and decision making more generally, and provides a mechanism for rapprochement between theories of decision making that employ deterministic response rules and those that postulate probabilistic response rules.
The effects of aging on selectivity and control in short-term recall
TLDR
Overall, the data suggest that although older adults recall fewer words than do younger adults, they exert as much control over some aspects of encoding.
Predicting and postdicting the effects of word frequency on memory
TLDR
This interaction suggests that subjects rely on different cues when making judgments during study than they do when making analogous judgments during the recognition test, and that the cues utilized during recognition lead judgments to be more accurate.
Representational explanations of "process" dissociations in recognition: the DRYAD theory of aging and memory judgments.
  • A. Benjamin
  • Psychology
    Psychological review
  • 1 October 2010
TLDR
An alternative theory is laid out that takes as a starting point the overwhelming evidence from the psychometric literature that the effects of age on memory share a single mediating influence, and assumes no differences between younger and older subjects other than a global difference in memory fidelity.
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