A-M Robreau

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Variegate porphyria (VP) is a low-penetrance, autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by skin lesions and acute neurovisceral attacks that occur separately or together. It results from partial deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase encoded by the PPOX gene. VP is relatively common in South Africa, where most patients have inherited the same(More)
Variegate porphyria (VP) is an autosomal dominant disorder of heme synthesis caused by a partial deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX). Human cDNA encoding PPOX has been recently sequenced and the gene has been cloned, assigned to chromosome 1q23, and its exon/intron organization has been characterized. We report here the complete nucleotide(More)
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the major autosomal dominant form of acute hepatic porphyrias. The disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding for porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase and is characterized by life-threatening neurovisceral attacks, often precipitated by drugs, fasting, cyclical hormonal changes, or infectious diseases. This report(More)
We investigated the possible role of chromosome 10q losses in colorectal cancer metastasis by carrying out an allelic imbalance study on a series of microsatellite instability-negative (MSI-) primary tumours (n=32) and metastases (n=36) from 49 patients. Our results demonstrate that 10q allelic losses are associated with a significant proportion (25%) of(More)
Variegate porphyria (VP) is an acute hepatic porphyria with autosomal dominant inheritance due to a partial deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) activity. The molecular defect responsible for VP was investigated by sequencing PPOX gene coding sequence from four patients in three unrelated VP families of French Caucasian origin. In a first(More)
Acute intermittent porphyria is the major autosomal dominant form of acute hepatic porphyrias. The disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding for porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Many different strategies have been developed to screen for mutations. However the high prevalence (0.6 per thousand) of PBGD gene defect, the large allelic heterogeneity of(More)
OBJECTIVES Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from a 50% deficiency in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG deaminase). The true prevalence in the general population of mutations in the PBG deaminase gene capable of causing AIP is unknown. However, it is important to identify asymptomatic carriers of AIP mutations(More)
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a partial defect of the heme biosynthesis enzyme, porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). PBGD is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner from a single gene. One transcript is expressed in erythroid tissues, while the housekeeping transcript is(More)
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by alterations of the gene encoding porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD: EC 4.3.1.8), the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The molecular heterogeneity of the mutations causing AlP has been demonstrated with a reported predominance of single base substitutions(More)
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a partial porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase deficiency. An exon-by-exon denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis followed by direct sequencing of the DNA fragments was performed to investigate molecular defect in 8 unrelated patients living in south of France: one(More)