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Techniques from graph theory are applied to analyze the bond networks in proteins and identify the flexible and rigid regions. The bond network consists of distance constraints defined by the covalent and hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in the protein, identified by geometric and energetic criteria. We use an algorithm that counts the degrees of freedom(More)
The realization that experimentally observed functional motions of proteins can be predicted by coarse-grained normal mode analysis has renewed interest in applications to structural biology. Notable applications include the prediction of biologically relevant motions of proteins and supramolecular structures driven by their structure-encoded collective(More)
MOTIVATION The knowledge of protein structure is not sufficient for understanding and controlling its function. Function is a dynamic property. Although protein structural information has been rapidly accumulating in databases, little effort has been invested to date toward systematically characterizing protein dynamics. The recent success of analytical(More)
The motions of large systems such as the ribosome are not fully accessible with conventional molecular simulations. A coarse-grained, less-than-atomic-detail model such as the anisotropic network model (ANM) is a convenient informative tool to study the cooperative motions of the ribosome. The motions of the small 30S subunit, the larger 50S subunit, and(More)
An assessment of the equilibrium dynamics of biomolecular systems, and in particular their most cooperative fluctuations accessible under native state conditions, is a first step towards understanding molecular mechanisms relevant to biological function. We present a web-based system, oGNM that enables users to calculate online the shape and dispersion of(More)
Rhodopsin is the only G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) whose 3D structure is known; therefore, it serves as a prototype for studies of the GPCR family of proteins. Rhodopsin dysfunction has been linked to misfolding, caused by chemical modifications that affect the naturally occurring disulfide bond between C110 and C187. Here, we identify the structural(More)
A new approach is presented for determining the rigid regions in proteins and the flexible joints between them. The short-range forces in proteins are modeled as constraints and we use a recently developed formalism from graph theory to analyze flexibility in the bond network. Forces included in the analysis are the covalent bond-stretching and bond-bending(More)
As the only member of the family of G-protein-coupled receptors for which atomic coordinates are available, rhodopsin is widely studied for insight into the molecular mechanism of G-protein-coupled receptor activation. The currently available structures refer to the inactive, dark state, of rhodopsin, rather than the light-activated metarhodopsin II (Meta(More)