A. Dennis Lemly

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  • A D Lemly
  • Environmental monitoring and assessment
  • 1993
It is now possible to formulate diagnostic selenium concentrations in four distinct ecosystem-level components; water, food-chain, predatory fish (consuming fish or invertebrate prey), and aquatic birds. Waterborne selenium concentrations of 2 µg/l or greater (parts per billion; total recoverable basis in 0.45 μ filtered samples) should be considered(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
  • 1985
A study was conducted to document patterns of accumulation and toxicity of selenium to organisms in a power plant cooling reservoir in North Carolina. Selenium entered the reservoir by way of effluent from the coal ash disposal basin, which contained 100-200 micrograms Se/liter. Concentrations of selenium in the lake water averaged 10 micrograms/liter, but(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
  • 1993
The prevalence of abnormalities and associated tissue selenium residues were assessed for the fish population of Belews Lake, North Carolina, and two reference lakes in 1975, 1978, 1982, and 1992. Teratogenic defects identified included lordosis, kyphosis, scoliosis, and head, mouth, and fin deformities. Many fish exhibited multiple malformations and some(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
  • 1997
Belews Lake, North Carolina, was contaminated by selenium in wastewater released from a coal-fired electric generating facility during 1974-1985. Selenium bioaccumulated in aquatic food chains and caused severe reproductive failure and teratogenic deformities in fish. Beginning in 1986, the electric utility company changed its ash disposal practices and(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
  • 1997
This paper describes a method for using teratogenic deformities in fish as the basis for evaluating impacts of selenium contamination. Teratogenic deformities are reliable bioindicators of selenium toxicosis in fish. They are produced in response to dietary exposure of parent fish and subsequent deposition of selenium in eggs. There is a close parallel(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Ecotoxicology and environmental safety
  • 1995
A procedure is described for conducting an aquatic hazard assessment of selenium. Hazard is characterized in terms of the potential for food-chain bioaccumulation and reproductive impairment in fish and aquatic birds, which are the most sensitive biological responses for estimating ecosystem-level impacts of selenium contamination. Five degrees of hazard(More)
The demand for water to support irrigated agriculture has led to the demise of wetlands and their associated wildlife for decades. This thirst for water is so pervasive that many wetlands considered to be hemispheric reserves for waterbirds have been heavily affected; for example, the California and Nevada wetlands in North America, the Macquarie Marshes in(More)
  • A D Lemly
  • Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP
  • 1985
Selenium can have severe ecological impacts on aquatic ecosystems even when waterborne concentrations are in the low microgram per liter (ppb) range. Episodes of environmental contamination have occurred that clearly illustrate the potential toxicity of this trace element to aquatic organisms. Wastes and effluents produced by the power industry are highly(More)
An investigation of differences in growth, maturation, biomass, and fecundity of Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in 3 host species was conducted on metapopulations from 3 distinct communities in Belews Lake, North Carolina. The results indicated that host-specific differences in growth and biomass were additive among metapopulations from different localities.(More)
Selenium pollution is a worldwide phenomenon and is associated with a broad spectrum of human activities, ranging from the most basic agricultural practices to the most high-tech industrial processes. Consequently, selenium contamination of aquatic habitats can take place in urban, suburban, and rural settings alike--from mountains to plains, from deserts(More)