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Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are genetic diseases with an extremely broad spectrum of clinical presentations due to defective glycosylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Some 45 CDG types have been reported since the first clinical description in 1980. Protein glycosylation disorders are defects in protein N- and/or O-glycosylation.(More)
The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex consists of eight subunits and plays a crucial role in Golgi trafficking and positioning of glycosylation enzymes. Mutations in all COG subunits, except subunit 3, have been detected in patients with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) of variable severity. So far, 3 families with a total of 10(More)
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by defects in the glucose-6-phosphatase complex. Deficient activity in the glucose-6-phosphatase-α catalytic unit characterizes GSD Ia and defects in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter protein characterize GSD Ib. Type Ia involves the liver,(More)
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys, resulting in hepatomegaly and renomegaly. Human chitotriosidase is a recently described fully active chitinase expressed by activated macrophages. Marked elevation of chitotriosidase activity was initially observed in plasma of patients with(More)
Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is caused by a mutation in the gene CLDN16, which encodes paracellin 1 (claudin-16), atight junction protein mediating paracellular transport which is expressed in the thick ascending loop of Henle and in the distal convoluted tubule, where reabsorption of magnesium occurs. We present(More)
Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in the glucose-6-phosphatase complex. Deficient activity in the glucose-6-phosphatase-a (G6Pase) catalytic unit characterizes GSD IA and defects in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter protein (G6PC) characterize GSD IB. The main clinical characteristics involve(More)
Hyperammonemia occurs mainly in patients with branched-chain organic acidemias such as propionic, methylmalonic, and isovaleric acidemias. Its pathophysiological process is mainly via the competitive inhibition of N-acetylglutamate synthetase. Oral carglumic acid (N-carbamylglutamate) administration can correct hyperammonemia in neonates with propionic and(More)
Crisponi syndrome (CS) and cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) share clinical characteristics, such as dysmorphic features, muscle contractions, scoliosis, and cold-induced sweating, with CS patients showing a severe clinical course in infancy involving hyperthermia associated with death in most cases in the first years of life. To date, 24(More)
Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder that leads to severe atherosclerosis related cardiovascular complications in young adults. Extracorporeal elimination is a method of LDL-lowering procedures effective in patients with homozygous or severe heterozygous FH utilized in cases. The recruitment of leucocytes into the arterial intima is dependent(More)